Aelle

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About Aelle

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    The Panda Man / NPC Designer / Horde Bias

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    Male
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    Denver, CO
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    Lorewalker Zhao-Long... and about 147377 others.

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  1. Aelle

    Southfury

    I AM READY
  2. In order for Paragon to survive, it needs to shift from being a Lore Adherent server to a Lore Friendly server. While lore adherence in the past was a fantastic edge for Paragon to have, ever since Pandaria (which people know I loved, but I know was not to everyone's taste) and going forwards, Blizzard's lore has REALLY, REALLY dipped. Whether it's the unfinished wreck that is Warlords of Draenor, the theme-park of mish-mashed ideas that don't at all gel that is the Broken Isles, the Burning Legion's piss-poor presence after the Broken Shore in Legion, or the absolutely fucking lamentable anime-weabo-esque "Lightforged Draenei" and Edge Void Elves and the utter stupidity of the Argus storyline, complete with gratuitous fan-suck-me-off-service of Sylvanas becoming Warchief for no decent reason or Illidan's resurrection for no decent reason. Whether it's the sheer pointlessness of the Highmountain Tauren, who are just regular Tauren with moose antlers, or the Nightborne... who are Highborne (that's literally what they are, save for some bullshit different Well explanation. Oh look, they're next door to vikings some reason... and some Tauren... for some other reason... is there no interaction at all between these two cultures? No.... k, cool). Whether it's the weak-ass Order Hall artifacts, as if they had any bearing on the Legion whatsoever (with only 6-7 of them being present at all in lore prior), the fact that they somehow magically blew up Sargeras' fucking sword like they were crystals in a Final Fantasy game, or the pointlessly shoe-horned storylines like the Emerald Nightmare... Legion was a writing and thematic disaster and the Lost Isles was nothing more than a terrible concoction of ideas sticky-taped together poorly... as was Warlords of Draenor before it, and probably as will be Battle for Azeroth after it. Even sticking to these storylines in an A-Z fashion is suicide for Paragon. Lore adherence has gone from being this server's golden thumb to it's achilles heel. Nobody enjoys the storyline of WoW anymore really. At least not enough people to form enough roleplayers to get involved. Forcing DM's to follow these railroads still, even if the tracks are a little wider and there are a few lanes, and making them pursue these particularly unappealing storylines are one of the many reasons that cause burn-out and for people to leave. There are other reasons too, but this is one of them, to be certain. Lore adherence also causes huge issues for new players due to the sheer amount of content done. Pretty much all of Vanilla WoW is cleared on Paragon. All of the Burning Crusade is cleared on Paragon, and anything involving the main storyline is considered done anyway. All of Wrath of the Lich King is cleared on Paragon, and anything involving the main storyline is considered done anyway. All of Cataclysm is cleared on Paragon, and anything involving the main storyline is considered done anyway. All of Mists of Pandaria is cleared on Paragon, and anything involving the main storyline is considered done anyway. Paragon has, up to this point, covered over a decade of Warcraft's lore, including characters, factions, locations, villains, enemy forces, and concepts. New players have no opportunity, no chance at all, to be involved in any of these huge storylines, which are held as paramount importance on Paragon due to the still-existent 'Progression' system, or any huge storylines aside from the current one at all, thanks to the shere strictness of Paragon's timeline. Progressing military characters these days is near impossible, and half of the interesting factions within the world have already been rendered redundant. Anything that is not considered almost biblically 'canon' (Even though I was iffy about it, see Jake's Phlogiston application for example) is disregarded as not being possible, even if the source is some shitty, half-cocked tweet sent out on a Blizzard employees lunch break or a removed quest. It's still considered ABSOLUTE LAW and even with changes that were coming in to effect during my time as a Staff Member, these attitudes were still clung to tightly and have stifled possible new content for people. My advice is, make the change from being LORE ADHERENT to LORE FRIENDLY in terms of Paragon's approach to Blizzard lore. Whereas Lore Adherence forces players to stick to the absolute canon storyline of World of Warcraft, which itself has just become a tired, 14-year-old hat of "it'd look cool and fans'll want to masturbate over it" ideas slung at a board with a dart, a beast which only continues to exist because it's a cash cow and Activision Blizzard have a fuckton of shareholders, Lore Friendliness takes the concepts, lands, races, cultures, classes, etc. of World of Warcraft, the setting basically (the vast majority of which are still great, and continue to be great going forward), and allows our DMs and players to pursue entirely new storylines of their own design within the WoW setting. Essentially, Azeroth goes from being a strict A-Z storyline system to a veritable playground of possible ideas, with Blizzard Lore being your toolbox to create something new and interesting. Let me explain to you why this is potentially a good idea. Warlords of Draenor's storyline infamously SUCKS. However, the greatest aspects of that expansion are not the actual storylines themselves but the core concepts and additions to the setting. The aesthetic changes and lore expansions to the Orcish Clans, seen in the Lords of War videos on Youtube and in-game, as well as the new and real definitions of Orcish clan culture were incredible. The expansions on Draenei culture and architecture, such as the additions of Vigilants and a more day-to-day-living view of the Draenei, such as the farmlands and places of worship and traders and the like, were wonderful too. The introduction of the High Arakkoa and the additions to Arakkoa culture and history in general, such as the Apexis, were such an incredible touch too and really helped bring that culture out. The Primals and the Breakers, while a tad silly, were well-presented and a good base concept to build on. Legion too has fantastic expansions on lore for groups such as the Demon Hunters, the Highborne/Nightborne, the Emerald Nightmare, and most importantly the Burning Legion. Instead of having the Legion storyline focus on the Broken Isles, why not change it to a massive worldwide invasion storyline for the lifetime of the 'expansion', with Kil'jaeden maybe not exploding with a little head-touch from Velen, or the award-winning "I AM MY SCARS!" cringe-worthiness of Argus at the end. Instead, get creative! Create a great and powerful demonic mastermind to antagonize players across the storyline of the invasion, and have them kill him at the end. Pursue new factions, new characters, new ideas for players to actively get involved in building from the ground up. Have massive battles that call huge forces in to question. Have old powers come back in new and creative ways. Have what remains of the Nerubians, Qiraji, and Mantid come together to form one great Aqir-born swarm in the service of the Old Gods. Have a group of Garrosh loyalists who were not present for the Siege of Orgrimmar and the subsequent events form a Horde splinter-faction of terrorist. Have the Naga launch full-scale shoreline invasions across Azeroth. Have the Vrykul band together under a new king and head across the sea to go raiding or the claim their vengeance upon the Alliance and the Horde in a great campaign. Have some of the Knights of the Ebon Blade succumb to their endless hunger, turning mad and heading to Northrend to raise and lead a new undead army. Have another elemental invasion. Have the Sha return and be unleashed in a great pandemic across the Eastern Kingdoms or Kalimdor. Have Vol'jin not die purely for the lip-service Sylvanas provides as Warchief, but maybe have Varian die still and Anduin take over. Those two had an interesting relationship in Pandaria. Maybe explore how that relationship could become strained due to reasons. "Uh, you can't do any of those. These lore sources clearly state that-." Well then FUCK THAT LORE. These are all viable options I just rattled off the top of my head for some interesting, large-scale storylines that can be interacted with via a campaign of smaller events, larger events, or whatever the DM team wishes to do and canon Blizzard lore, slung out by some guy on Twitter who just wants all you nerds to shut up and get a life, is doing nothing but tying your hands, tying everybody's hands, and stifling creative options. It is within the creative capabilities of many of the minds on this server to create something new and amazing from Blizzard's framework. I believe many of you would be capable of creating an interesting and compelling character that people could grow attached too and really be driven towards defeating. You just need to be willing to let go of the safety rail Lore Adherence has provided you guys with up until now, because that rail has started to lead you in to a pit of lava with 'dead server' written on the wall above it. Don't be afraid to 'Go Big or Go Home', and don't be scared to make a mess once in a while. These are some of my thoughts on the subject, anyway.
  3. Just because you're a powerful practitioner of a particular school, doesn't meant that that school does not have it's physical limitations. A mage might be a proficient spellcaster, able to shift whole cities by themselves. This does not mean they do not run out of mana. As I said prior, mana is the energy from which all forms of magic materialise. Just because one's faith causes the holy light to materialise as opposed to a scientific calculation (unless you're a Blood Knight a la Lady Liadrin, in which case no faith is required) used by the arcane, it does not mean that mana is not still required to make these things work. Just because they may not be aware of mana, or the true source of their powers, does not mean that these things are not there. We must also consider the potential ignorance of many of the beings of Azeroth, as not every wandering Joe has access to or is aware that the Keepers of Ulduar created almost everything and that the Naaru are really these dudes, floating about.
  4. A big thank you to everyone who attended! It was a tad longer than I had anticipated, but I hope that all involved enjoy themselves.
  5. I have various ex-military friends here in Denver. Can 100% confirm that the army is nerd-central. Paragon is indeed very different now in terms of its climate. The Staff and Admin team are almost entirely reformed, with a great shift in the playerbase both leaving and joining. It kind of feels like the 'next generation' of Paragon players are now here, doing their thang. Certain rules and regulations have changed. Although Paragon remains a lore-adherent server that sticks to Warcraft's setting, things have become a lot more lenient in terms of just how strictly we adhere to the exact lore of the universe. Main storylines are now followed via the A-Z system as opposed to being rigidly scripted carbon-copies of the retail questlines. Equally, lore from Blizzard can be called into question and is not treated as biblical text if alterations suggested could vastly improve roleplay potential or if lore introduced actively restricts roleplay or is just not feasible for Paragon's setting. There are a few other mundane changes too. Always worth checking over past Staff Meeting threads in the archive. Also, potentially welcome back!
  6. From my understanding of faith-based classes, everything comes from somewhere! Draenei Vindicators and Anchorites, for example, draw their powers from the Naaru. Blood Knights pull from the Sunwell, and although Human Priests of the Holy Light and Knights of the Silver Hand and Night Elven Sisters of the Moon don't have a confirmed sources of their power, it is speculated that Elune is in fact a Naaru herself, and that members of the Church of the Holy Light draw upon the spirit of Tyr. At any rate, like all things, light has a source. More importantly though is our understanding of evocation and how mana actually works. Mana is the rawest form of magic and is the base from which all forms of magic materialise, which one expends to shape it into whatever have you, depending on their source of power. Though the light is present almost everywhere, a Priest or Paladin would likely expend mana through active practice of their faith in order to make the Light itself materialise. Through their prayers and worship, they would inadvertently draw upon the mana present in their own spiritual energy to shape the light around them into something real, just as mage does with the arcane or a Warlock would with Fel. Practically every Human believes in the Light, as the Holy Light is itself Stormwind's state religion. Despite this, not every Tom, Dick, and Harry can actively call upon the Light to do whatever they feel like. The Light itself must be formed in to being by a practitioner, just as the arcane or the fel must. Much like Shaman however, the practice is based upon faith and religious connotations as aposed to logical, scientific process. The craft could still be treated as such however, as we see the Blood Knights of Silvermoon wield the Holy Light with little to no faith or, in the past, actively against the very tenants of the faith of light practitioners. Essentially speaking, Light-wielders who call upon their powers through faith are 'accidental' spellcasters who believe that their faith and religion are causing the powers of the Holy Light to 'answer their prayers', despite this not actually being the case as far as meta-knowledge goes. Also, we need to consider what would just be fucking ridiculous within our own setting of Paragon and a spellcaster, any kind of spellcaster, who can just keep shitting out spells inexhaustibly would be just that. It would be powergaming to play such a overpowered character and we would almost certainly not allow it. In summary, our understanding of the Light (as seen in various incarnations), of how mana works, and what is fair for roleplay would lead me to surmise that the light does indeed require mana to actually materialise.
  7. There are already flaws in this system as it stands, and I have made them known to Drak. A lot of it also has to do with how our own activity is self-monitored.
  8. Drak, your Shaman can reserve a spot still. Drakmar can reserve a spot too.
  9. It was deep within the heart of Blackrock Mountain that the space between worlds, between Azeroth and the elemental plane of the Firelands, grew weak and was sundered. Sorcerer-Thane Thaurissan of the Dark Iron Clan uttered the words of damnation that brought nothing but an infernal death upon him and the lands outstretched from the foothills the great mountain. Soon, his spirit was bound and his people enslaved by the lord of the flame, Ragnaros. It was in these blazing lands that the Blackrock Clan of Orcs fled and held up in the final battles of the Second War and although they were left utterly defeated, many remained within the confines of the mountain and in the areas decimated by the fires of Ragnaros and the inhabitants of the Firelands. One such bastion of the Blackrock Clan was Rend’kar Fortress, located in the mountainous rises surrounding the blasted lands, cast over with the flaming shadow of Blackrock Mountain. Since the fall of Rend Blackhand and the defeat of the Blackrock Clan at the hands of Horde and Alliance adventurers, the remains of the Blackrock Settlements outside of the mountain itself have gone quiet, with many locations such as Rend’kar being abandoned. This served the machinations of the Twilight’s Hammer perfectly. Under the shadow of the mountain, the cult snuck through the blasted lands from places unknown and seized control of the fortress. There, the Twilight’s Hammer wish to once again tear through the fragile barrier between the world of Azeroth and the Firelands beyond. Establishing a stable portal to the elemental plane, the powerful servants of the warring Firelords pour forth, bringing burning chaos and flaming destruction with them and granting the most daring leader of the cult cell the boons of the Firelands, ascending him to a position of god-like status. In the wake of this disturbance, the Earthen Ring have heeded the call of the elements once more. Lead by the mighty fire shaman, Orek’thar of the Warsong Clan, the Earthen Ring now seek to destroy the Twilight’s Hammer Clan located within the temple. However, it is not their intent to destroy the portal itself. No indeed, the Earthen Ring believe they can finally establish within the fortress a permanent place of worship for those Shaman seeking to call the flame. The stable portal might also finally allow the Shaman of the Earthen Ring to appease and commune with the elemental dwellers of the Firelands. In response to the threat of the Twilight's Hammer, Orek'thar and the shaman of the Earthen Ring have put out a call to arms for those to whom the fate of the elements is of great consequence, and for their allies too whom might come to the aid of the flame. The battle for the Sulfuron Temple is about to begin. OOC INFORMATION: This conflict will be taking place ICly in the Burning Steppes, in an abandoned Blackrock fortress against the Twilight's Hammer, so be sure that your character has a relevant reason to be there. There will be a maximum limit of 7 PLAYERS who may attend the event. Due to the nature of the conflict, Shaman will receive first priority slots in the event. The event will be taking place at 7PM Server Time on Thursday February 8th. This event is liable to be very short, with a small series of intense battles. Be prepared to possibly get your ass kicked at points, but don't worry about committing too long to the fight. Try to avoid ICly destroying the building if at all possible. This event was simply made as a cool storyline for players to be involved in, that provides a little context and backstory to public interiors for Shaman to use for years to come in their RP. Trashing the place purely for OOC lulz will not be appreciated. tl;dr - Don't be a dick. Players with Shaman wishing to commit them to this fight can post on this thread to let me know and I shall reserve a spot for you. However, if you do not show up for the event roughly on time, I will give the spot over to another willing participant.
  10. Tol'vir are actually legit as fuck. They just don't quite make it to me top 10.
  11. *cracks knuckles* 1) PANDAREN Rather obviously, Pandaren are my favorite race in WoW. Their representation and culture in Mists of Pandaria was exquisite and I love the lore behind their everyday life, beliefs, and overall culture. The Pandaren live for peace, happiness, friends, family, and a simple life to enjoy. They fight and learn to fight only to defend their homes and loved ones and are free of ego and edge. In a setting like Warcraft and a server like Paragon, this is a very, very welcome break. 2) NERUBIANS The Nerubian Empire is something I've been absolutely obsessed with since it's appearance in Warcraft III. Azjol-Nerub itself was woefully underrepresented in WoW and remains one of my biggest rages to this day. Still, despite this, what little we did receive was incredible and I remain a huge fan of this race. 3) TUSKARR I love the Tuskarr for many of the same reasons that I love the Pandaren. Their heavily Alaskan/Inuit aesthetic and inspiration, their culture, their pleasant, simple, and relatively peaceful disposition are all major attractors. I love their appearance too, and how Blizzard was able to adapt their walrus features to be used as methods of portraying their culture. I need an excuse to play one again. 4) BLOOD ELVES (WARCRAFT III / BURNING CRUSADE ERA) This might come as a surprise to many of you but there was once a time that I utterly adored the Blood Elves. Prior to the Mary-Sue Machine that is the Sunwell providing them with good-guy powers unlimited, the Blood Elves were a dynamic and unique approach to Elves in fantasy. Their magical addictions, withdrawal, temptations, and associations with the fastest and loosest fixes for this addiction were so much fun to roleplay with and made for some great storytelling, portraying a desperate people who would go to any length to satiate their cursed addiction. They were let off the hook a little too early, in my opinion, or perhaps they weren't? Perhaps all that really needed to be told of their story was told in the Burning Crusade? 5) MOGU Ah, the Mogu. What a underutilized villain they have been. Their elaborate architecture and designs and their reputation as being reckless spellcasters and utterly vainglorious in their ambitions made for such brilliant, tyrannical villains. Lei Shen was a massively underrated villain and I'd have loved to have seen him used for more than a single raid. 6) SHA While there were so many other awesome villainous forces in Warcraft, as well as the idea being far from original, there was something about the Sha I really, really loved. Perhaps it was, to my eyes, the best portrayal of the extent of the Old Gods' power on Azeroth, as well as that sickly black-and-white aesthetic to all of their stuff. Something about the Sha was certainly incredibly unsettling and intimidating. They made you yourself your own worst enemy. Their music was great too. 7) ORCS Ask almost anyone (except people on Paragon) who enjoys fantasy fiction which franchise has the best Orcs, and they will all almost unanimously say Warcraft. I love the clan cultures of the Orcs in Warcraft, and their more honor-driven nature and genuine character beyond "ME SMASH!". To me, as a Trekkie, they've always seemed like fantasy Klingons. They're just fucking cool. 8) WORGEN I like Victoriana, I like Werewolves, I like the rain, I like dark places, I like rural England. Nuff said. 9) VRYKUL Everything about the Vrykul screams stereotypical norseman and I fucking love every second of it. They're big, burly viking dudes who live under the northern lights in a Fjord. What more can you ask for? 10) DRAENEI There's a lot I could say about the Draenei, but I'm tired and there are wolves chasing me. I love their appearance, more so than anything else. As a big Warcraft III fan, the ability to play good-guy Archimondes was super, super exciting. I love their beginning area more so than I think any others. Though their subsequent appearances have been... generally less than satisfactory, their first appearance in The Burning Crusade quickly shot them up there for me.
  12. The Shattered Hand region would have a focus in the general rogues of Orgrimmar. While it will still house loyal members of the clan within the Horde, the Shattered Hand as an organization will be heavily present, including various rogues from other races too. Eh, this is just a little pet project of mine. I kinda like having things to build.
  13. Alright so! This is something I had planned on working on for a little while now, and is just a little building project of mine. But before I proceed, I wanted to gauge the interest and opinions of the community at large first. Within the Horde (particularly the Orcs), clan identity always has been, still is, and probably always will be a major part of roleplay. Practically every single Orcish character I have seen on Paragon and retail alike has their clan listed in their TRP and a huge amount of their appearance and personality, including their class, is often based on their clan of origin. Blizzard clearly noticed this interest themselves, with Warlords of Draenor focusing strongly on clan identity and culture in more depth (the Orcs and the Iron Horde being one of the coolest elements of Warlords of Draenor from a conceptual and background-based perspective). During Cataclysm too, a spotlight was once again shone on individual clans, with Garrosh Hellscream showing more devotion to his own clan than Thrall did to the Frostwolves, and other clans, such as the Blackrock Clan and the Dragonmaw Clan, once again returning to the lore stage as entities in their own right. Despite this though, the Orcs of the New Horde remain shockingly homogenized and single-colored (red. Everything red.). To that end, I intend to create small, expanded sections of Orgrimmar that are dedicated to each clan respectively, wherein members who still hold their clan heritage and traditions close at heart might be able to live and practice their particular customs in relative peace, preserving their clan's origins and identity even within the New Horde. Each 'suburb' or area would be relatively small, likely consisting of a tavern, two or three small houses, and a building that might be relevant to each clan and their traditions (A Barracks for the Warsong Clan, an Armory for the Blackrock Clan, a Spirit Hut for the Bleeding Hollow, etc.) ICly, these regions of Orgrimmar would've sprung up around the the beginning of Cataclysm, just following Garrosh Hellscream's ascension to Warchief. His own traditionalist views would've inspired more clan-loyal traditionalists to branch out and build in places where they can more freely express their culture and practices. Waystones to each section of the city will appear as sign posts, with the clan’s banner attached and the waystone connected to the pointer, located throughout Orgrimmar. Above, you'll find a poll, where you're free to vote as to whether you think this'd be awesome or nein. Either way, I'd love to hear the community's opinions regarding this.
  14. COMPLETED It was deep within the heart of Blackrock Mountain that the space between worlds, between Azeroth and the elemental plane of the Firelands, grew weak and was sundered. Sorcerer-Thane Thaurissan of the Dark Iron Clan uttered the words of damnation that brought nothing but an infernal death upon him and the lands outstretched from the foothills the great mountain. Soon, his spirit was bound and his people enslaved by the lord of the flame, Ragnaros. It was in these blazing lands that the Blackrock Clan of Orcs fled and held up in the final battles of the Second War and although they were left utterly defeated, many remained within the confines of the mountain and in the areas decimated by the fires of Ragnaros and the inhabitants of the Firelands. One such bastion of the Blackrock Clan was Rend’kar Fortress, located in the mountainous rises surrounding the blasted lands, cast over with the flaming shadow of Blackrock Mountain. Since the fall of Rend Blackhand and the defeat of the Blackrock Clan at the hands of Horde and Alliance adventurers, the remains of the Blackrock Settlements outside of the mountain itself have gone quiet, with many locations such as Rend’kar being abandoned. This served the machinations of the Twilight’s Hammer perfectly. Under the shadow of the mountain, the cult snuck through the blasted lands from places unknown and seized control of the fortress. There, the Twilight’s Hammer wish to once again tear through the fragile barrier between the world of Azeroth and the Firelands beyond. Establishing a stable portal to the elemental plane, the powerful servants of the warring Firelords pour forth, bringing burning chaos and flaming destruction with them and granting the most daring leader of the cult cell the boons of the Firelands, ascending him to a position of god-like status. In the wake of this disturbance, the Earthen Ring have heeded the call of the elements once more. Lead by the mighty fire shaman, Orek’thar of the Warsong Clan, the Earthen Ring now seek to destroy the Twilight’s Hammer Clan located within the temple. However, it is not their intent to destroy the portal itself. No indeed, the Earthen Ring believe they can finally establish within the fortress a permanent place of worship for those Shaman seeking to call the flame. The stable portal might also finally allow the Shaman of the Earthen Ring to appease and commune with the elemental dwellers of the Firelands. The battle for the Sulfuron Temple is about to begin. Many thousands of years ago, what is now the sleepy, Goblin-controlled land of Azshara was once the home of the great Highborne city of Eldarath. Many tall and resplendent structures stood within the city itself, great monoliths that served as testament to the Highborne’s unquestionable culture, power, and importance. Ili’annae Temple was one such building, a beautiful hall of stone graced with a courtyard of flowing water and sparkling fountains of an almost magical nature. It was here that the Highborne came to relax and enjoy the pleasant, radiant beauty of their city from a place of comfort and enjoyment. Those few who were faithful to the goddess Elune also came to pay reverence to their moon deity and pray in peace. This all changed when the Shattering tore the city to shreds, leaving but a shattered ruin of what was once a shining jewel within the city. Dilapidated, sand-stricken, and lost to time, Ili’annae Temple now stands in ruins, forgotten by all. This served the Twilight’s Hammer perfectly, whom collectively arrived upon the shores of Azshara and took over the ruin as a base of operations. Upon seeing the arrival of the Hydraxxian Warlords a few years prior, the Twilight’s Hammer surmised the location to be of great importance to the elemental plane of water, the Abyssal Maw, and have begun calling upon the spirits of the sea to commence their invasion anew. These ripples in the waves could be felt by those shaman sensitive to the plight of the world. Xuuran of the Draenei Krokul, the Broken, many of whom have taken up the relatively recent art of Shamanism, was one such kindred spirit to feel the disturbance upon the water’s surface. Now, he and the Earthen Ring seek to rid the temple of the Twilight’s Hammer and redeem the place once more, as a center of reverence for the waters for all Shaman who are sensitive to it. The battle for the Temple of the Tides is about to begin. So little is known about the Titans, still. It is believed that it was they that were responsible for the creation of life as we know it on Azeroth, not at least through the work of their servants, the Keepers in Ulduar. In their capacity as the guardians of Azeroth and the jailors of the Old God, Yogg-Saron, the Keepers constructed many wondrous architectural marvels across Azeroth, particularly in Northrend, where they dwell. Along the shores of Lake Wintergrasp, and the basin in which the frozen waters slowly flow, are the perfect places to see such incredible structures. One such location is a great weather tower, located a little further west along the shoreline. Upon its discovery, it was unknown exactly what function this tower truly served, and all attempts to access and activate its systems have thus far been met with failure. It is indeed commonly believed that the tower is in such a state of disrepair that it cannot again be made to function properly. This did not deter the likes of the Twilight’s Hammer however, who soon moved in to the walled structure and began calling upon the disruptive powers of the elements in order bring about a new age of elemental chaos in the north. Twisting the flow of the north wind, the cult of the Old Gods wish to secure a permanent connection to the Skywall, from which the Wind Lords of the elemental plane may begin their invasion of Azeroth anew. The winds whisper words far and wide, however, and the sense of unbridled corruption and the perversion of the flow of the elements could be felt as far as Aerie Peak. There, Gwynara Stormfeather of the Wildhammer Clan of Dwarves heard the call of the elements upon the breeze and began hatching a plan. Gathering her fellow members of the Earthen Ring, she plans on heading to Northrend to rid the station of the vile cultists and establish a permanent place for those that hear the call of the winds. With the stable portal to the Skywall established, she hopes to finally begin mending the rift between the shaman of Azeroth and the denizens of the elemental plane. The battle for the Temple of the Four Winds is about to begin. Before the coming of the Horde to Kalimdor, the Tauren people were a species that found themselves on the brink of annihilation. Scattered across central Kalimdor, they were hunted almost to extinction by the marauding Centaur and ever-expanding Quillboar. Though Thrall’s intervention and the Tauren admission in to the Horde ultimately saved many of the noble civilization, many more had already paid the price. The Village of the Lost Tribe in the plains of the Barrens is a testament to one such loss. Though Tauren once lived here, many years before, all that remains within the village are the ghosts and memories of a nameless tribe, now lost and forgotten to the lands. The Twilight’s Hammer come as an insult, if nothing else, to the memory of these people when they took control of the village. With the recent uprisings of the elements of Deepholm across central Kalimdor, the Twilight’s Hammer seek to break the bond between the elemental plane and the realm of Azeroth and allow the rampaging elements of stone to pass through and unleash havoc upon the land. Talhar Cloudsong of Thunder Bluff refuses to allow this insult and this threat to his people to stand. He calls upon the Earthen Ring, and those loyal to them, to assist him in ridding the village of the vile cultists so that he and his fellow shaman may work towards soothing the lands around them and forging peace between the elements of Deepholm and the Shaman of Azeroth. It is by his will that the village of a long forgotten tribe might serve a more honorable legacy, as the home of those that care for the earth itself and wish to revere it. The battle for the Temple of Stone is about to begin. OOC - THE EVENTS: So these events are built around four custom interiors that I have constructed in the Burning Steppes, Azshara, Wintergrasp, and the Barrens. The intent of these temples was to create a place for Shaman to visit, roleplay, and possibly even pilgrimage to. Each location is built within something that could’ve been reclaimed from the area and is located in a region where a particular element is known to have strong activity, without literally being shoved right next to the entrance of the Elemental Plane. Rather than just create each temple and hand them to the playerbase, I figured they would be great locations for a series of events in which the players must first reclaim the temples from the grasp of the Twilight’s Hammer. After the events are complete, the Earthen Ring will move in and the locations will be transformed in to places of worship for a particular element where Shaman may come and continue their training. Though there are currently waystones located out in the world for players to find, each temple can be found at their respective simple .t, which are thus: The Sulfuron Temple - .t firetemple The Temple of the Tides - .t watertemple The Temple of the Four Winds - .t windtemple The Temple of Stone - .t earthtemple With the conclusion of the events, the waystones will likely be moved to more centralized locations that are easier to find for players, so that more people might happen upon them. It is my intent to run these events myself, but if any other GMs or DMs are interested in doing so, please do contact me via PM so that I can give you more details. This thread is simply to make you aware of the locations and the events which will be going down. Each individual temple event will have their own thread, with this thread being archived along with the last temple run. I'll be sure to announce actual dates and the like soon enough. Shaman, particularly those allied with or associated with the Earthen Ring, will be prioritized. Next, characters that are residents of the regions themselves, or are from locations nearby. Finally, everybody else!